Schooling in America: Public Opinion on K–12 Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic - EdChoice

Research

  • Dec 15 2020

Schooling in America: Public Opinion on K–12 Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic

By Paul DiPerna, Drew Catt, Michael Shaw

Unlike previous years of our Schooling in America survey project, our researchers are releasing multiple sets of results in a new, chart-focused format. This report is focused on the second wave of questions we asked about public opinion on K-12 education during the COVID pandemic. We also asked respondents their opinion on educational choice reforms and policies.

Click here for a blog post featuring key findings from this survey report.

(Crosstabs files in PDF format available on request.)

What Will I Learn? Download Report

In this report, you will learn:

  • 1

    Parents report that their children are feeling less happy and more stressed since our spring survey.

    Parents now more often say their children are less happy than they indicated back in the spring (45% fall vs. 38% spring). Similarly, we have seen an increase among the proportion of parents who say their children are more stressed since the spring (53% fall vs. 45% spring).
  • 2

    In October, parents are still very worried about their child getting COVID, and a higher percentage of lower-income parents are not comfortable sending their kids back to school in person.

    Overall, nearly 60 percent of parents are concerned their child might contract the virus. Nearly half of lower-income parents (48%) are not at all comfortable sending their children to school in person, which is significantly higher than higher-income (26%) or middle-income parents (39%) giving the same response.
  • 3

    Public levels of support are at all-time highs for different types of educational choice policies, based on our annual survey trends.

    Education savings accounts or ESAs received the highest level of support—81 percent—of any other type of educational choice in the eight years we have polled on the policy type. Vouchers and tax-credit scholarships registered 73 and 74 percent support respectively. Charter schools registered 72 percent support
  • 4

    More than three out of five Americans (63%) say K-12 education is on the wrong track.

    That reflects a seven percentage point increase since the spring and the highest level since 2013. Private school parents are by far the most positive about K–12 education this fall, compared to other sectors. Homeschool parents are the most negative.

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