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What is School Choice?

THE FRIEDMAN FOUNDATION’S GOAL

We believe public education funds should follow students to the schools or services that best fit their needs.

Here’s how school choice opponents believe education funding should work in America.

  • Student Enrollment

    • 87% attend public schools
    • 10% enroll in private schools
    • 3% learn at home
  • Student Funding

    • 100% for public schools
    • 0% for private schools
    • 0% for home schools

Here’s how we think it should look...

  • Student Enrollment

    • 87% attend public schools
    • 10% enroll in private schools
    • 3% learn at home
  • Student Funding

    • 87% for public schools
    • 10% for private schools
    • 3% for home schools

As enrollments change—based on families’ choices—so too should the funding. The purpose of public education is to educate the public. Thus, we should care more about students being educated, and less about the settings their parents choose. After all, successfully educated public, private, and home school students all contribute to the public good. Click below to see if or how your state provides students with school choice.

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Types of School Choice

AND HOW EACH WORKS

Watch our videos on how vouchers, tax-credit scholarships, education savings accounts, and individual tax credits and deductions function for parents and communities.

How School Vouchers Work

Vouchers give parents all or a portion of the public funding set aside for their children’s education to choose private schools that best fit their learning needs. State funds typically expended by a school district are allocated to families in the form of a voucher to pay partial or full tuition at a private school, including religious and non-religious options. Watch this video for more, then click View Fast Facts to read more about school vouchers in America.
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How ESAs Work

Education savings accounts (ESAs) allow parents to withdraw their children from public district or charter schools and receive a deposit of public funds into government-authorized savings accounts. Those funds can cover private school tuition and fees, online learning programs, private tutoring, educational therapies, college course costs, and other higher education expenses. Watch this video for more, then click View Fun Facts to read more about ESAs in America.
View Fast Facts

How Tax-Credit Scholarships Work

Tax-credit scholarships allow taxpayers to receive full or partial tax credits for donating to nonprofits that provide K–12 private school scholarships. The amount of tax credits distributed is capped at an amount determined by the legislature, which, in turn, affects the availability and size of scholarships. Watch this video for more, then click View Fast Facts to read more about tax-credit scholarships in America.
View Fast Facts

How Individual Tax Credits and Deductions Work

Through individual tax credits and deductions, parents can receive state income tax relief for approved educational expenses, which can include private school tuition, books, supplies, computers, tutors, and transportation. Tax credits lower the total taxes a person owes; a deduction reduces a person’s total taxable income. Watch this video for more, then click View Fast Facts to read more about individual tax credits and deductions in America.
View Fast Facts

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